What would a HyFlex program have meant to you?

 

Originally posted on October 26, 2012 by Brian Beatty

Continuing on with the thread about student experience…

I was reflecting on my own path through education the other day and I started thinking about what my experience may have been like if I had the HyFlex course option as an undergrad, credential student, masters student, or PhD student.

One thing that I appreciated immediately was that I did experience elements of what eventually became HyFlex course design in different places along the way./ Whenever a faculty member would combine classroom and online activities, resources, and learning processes, I experienced HyFlex – without the Flex. (I guess that would be “Hybrid”, then 🙂  Whenever a teacher would say, “This is an optional resource [or activity].” I experienced a bit of HyFlex – without the Hy. (Flexibility to participate or not)

HyFlex delivery is often similar to the ways some faculty have taught some students in some courses (and programs) over the years, but tends to make a stronger commitment to full hybridization and full flexibility, turning over more control over learning to the student. (And, one could argue, better preparing students for the rest of their lives as worker-learners.)

If I had HyFlex courses in my past, I wouldn’t have dropped a few letter grades in classes because I couldn’t drag myself to 8:00 AM Physics or Freshman Composition class, and I may have been able to create a more customized schedule at various times… who knows?

How about you? How would have the HyFlex course design impacted your experience as a student?

Author

  • Brian Beatty

    Dr. Brian Beatty is Associate Professor of Instructional Technologies in the Department of Equity, Leadership Studies and Instructional Technologies at San Francisco State University. At SFSU, Dr. Beatty pioneered the development and evaluation of the HyFlex course design model for blended learning environments, implementing a “student-directed-hybrid” approach to better support student learning.

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